fbpx

Supporting Studies

PURSUING WOMEN’S ECONOMIC EMPOWERMENT

International Monetary Fund, May 2018

The International Monetary Fund assessed the financial inclusion of women in various countries and findings suggest that “enhanced financial inclusion would increase female labor force participation and entrepreneurship, support small and medium size enterprises, and improve competitiveness and boost potential growth…Despite progress, women and men do not have the same opportunities to participate in economic activity to promote better development outcomes.” SBS’ train-the-trainer approach increases potential exponentially.

WOMEN AT WORK

International Labour Organization, 2016

“In addition to systemic barriers common to all entrepreneurs (such as access to inputs), women entrepreneurs usually face additional barriers, including discriminatory legal systems, namely inheritance laws, property law and customary laws, and social attitudes and norms that prevent them from starting new businesses or consolidating or expanding existing ones, and moving outside the informal economy. As a result, the potential of women entrepreneurs is highly underdeveloped. The ILO estimates that 50 per cent of women’s productive potential is underused, compared to 22 per cent of men’s (ILO, 2014e).” The SBS model fosters confidence in entrepreneurs.

THE POWER OF PARITY: HOW ADVANCING WOMEN’S EQUALITY CAN ADD $12 TRILLION TO GLOBAL GROWTH

McKinsey Global Institute, 2015

“Besides direct effects, increased participation among women in the work force has second-order impacts on GDP, including increased consumption and savings due to higher incomes, intergenerational impact from improved health and education among children, and potentially higher productivity due to greater female entrepreneurship. Studies have analyzed the impact of bridging the full labor-force participation gap between men and women and have found it could boost GDP by anywhere from 5 to 20 percent for most countries.” The SBS model improves economies.

GENDER EQUALITY IN EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT AND ENTREPRENEURSHIP: FINAL REPORT TO THE MCM 2012

Organization for Economic Development, 2012

”At times of high unemployment, women-owned businesses make a key contribution to household incomes and economic growth. Entrepreneurship is equally important in developing countries for job creation, innovation and growth. Fostering entrepreneurship is a key policy goal for governments in all countries; there are shared expectations that high rates of entrepreneurial activity will bring sustained employment creation…There is a clear need to provide more and better information about entrepreneurship as an attractive career option, both for young women in school and or women who are outside the labour force and considering starting work.” SBS trains participants in business acumen.

GLOBAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP MONITOR GLOBAL REPORT

Global Entrepreneurship Monitor, 2018/2019

“There is often a misperception that entrepreneurs in emerging or developing countries are mostly necessity-driven and starting low-potential businesses. GEM has provided evidence to refute this myth. Opportunity drives the majority of entrepreneurs in every economy, and many entrepreneurs strive to improve their lives through better income or more independence in their work. GEM also demonstrates the impact entrepreneurs have across the world by introducing innovations into their societies, creating jobs, competing globally, and contributing to the emergence and growth of industries.” SBS Coaches cultivate entrepreneurial opportunities.